Protease Enzyme Therapy for Cancer and Papaya Leaf

Scientists continue to work to define the reason why proteases like the ones in papaya leaf (papain and chymopapain) have shown to slow the growth of tumors.

“…we have discovered that proenzyme therapy, mandated first by John Beard nearly one hundred years ago, shows remarkable selective effects that result in growth inhibition of tumor cells with metastatic potential.”

-Proenzyme therapy of cancer. Novak JF, et al. Anticancer Res. 2005 Mar-Apr.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/15868959/

John Beard, a Scottish doctor, proved the effect of trypsin (a protease taken from a young cow) on halting the growth of tumors in humans by injecting part of the Pancreas of the young cow straight into human tumors.

Papain has been shown to be more powerful of a protease than trypsin.

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Studies Linking Cancer Survival to Papain (The enzyme in Papaya Leaf)

Papain is an active enzyme found in the natural papaya leaf. Papain is typically combined with two other proteases in oral enzyme therapy. The clinical study referenced below shows a significant positive difference in the survival rate for patients taking papain.

Systemic Enzyme Therapy in Oncology Effect and Mode of Action
Jörg Leipner and Reinhard Saller

Drugs 2000 Apr; 59 (4): 769-780

“…In this retrospective parallel-group cohort analysis, 166 patients who had received papain/trypsin/chymotrypsin (2 tablets 3 times daily) for at least 6 months were assigned to the active treatment group. The aim of the study was to investigate any effect of enzyme therapy on survival. A statistically significant mean prolongation of survival of 36 months was seen in patients with Stage III multiple myeloma (n = 54) in the enzyme group compared with the control group (n = 36) [83 months versus 47 months].”

Additional cases were reviewed naming less suffering and more survival when oral enzyme therapy that included papain was used as a complement to chemotherapy and radiation.

The mechanism of action was concluded to be:
“…This may constitute one of the mechanisms of action of enzyme therapy: orally administered enzymes seem to induce the synthesis of antiproteinases which in turn inactivate proteinases such as cathepsines”

What Papaya Leaf Tea Can Stimulate Macrophages To Do

20130624-111330.jpg

Scientists have discovered that papaya leaf tea stimulates macrophages, the “big eaters” in your body. The function of macrophages is one key to battling auto-immune disease. The reason is that macrophages clean up waste in your body including poisons, pathogens, and, of course, cancer cells.

In photo above the macrophage is extending its arms to engulf two pathogens.

A very good description of the effect that macrophages have on auto-immune disease was published in Science Daily (below):

American Physiological Society (2010, August 27).

Macrophages: The ‘defense’ cells that help throughout the body. –ScienceDaily. Retrieved

Aug. 27, 2010 — The term “macrophage” conjures images of a hungry white blood cell gobbling invading bacteria. However, macrophages do much more than that: Not only do they act as antimicrobial warriors, they also play critical roles in immune regulation and wound-healing. They can respond to a variety of cellular signals and change their physiology in response to local cues.

“There has been a huge outpouring of research about host defense that has overshadowed the many diverse activities that these cells do all the time,” said Dr. Mosser. “We’d like to dispel the narrow notion that most people have that macrophages’ only role is defense, and expand it to include their role in homeostasis.”

Monocyte Differentiation
Macrophages exist in nearly all tissues and are produced when white blood cells called monocytes leave the blood and differentiate in a tissue-specific manner. The type of macrophage that results from monocyte differentiation depends on the type(s) of cytokines that these cells encounter. Cytokines are proteins produced by immune cells that can influence cell behavior and affect interactions between cells. For example, macrophages that battle microbial invaders arise in response to interferon-γ, a cytokine that is produced during a cellular immune response involving helper T-cells and the factors they produce. These macrophages are considered to be “classically activated.”
However, when monocytes differentiate in response to stimuli such as prostaglandins or glucocorticoids, the resulting macrophages will assume a “regulatory” phenotype. Alternately, wound-healing macrophages arise when monocytes differentiate in response to interleukin-4, a cytokine which is released during tissue injury…

Immune Regulation
Immune-regulating macrophages produce high levels of the cytokine interleukin-10, which helps suppress the body’s immune response. Suppressing an immune response may seem counter-intuitive, but in the later stages of immunity it comes in handy because it limits inflammation.

According to Dr. Mosser, immune-regulating macrophages may hold the key to developing treatments for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The focus of new research is on reprogramming the macrophages to assume a regulatory phenotype and prevent autoimmunity, he said.
There is broad potential for exploiting different stages of macrophage activation, Dr. Mosser added. “It might be possible to manipulate macrophages to make better vaccines, prevent immunosuppression, or develop novel therapeutics that promote anti-inflammatory immune responses.”

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100826141232.htm

In with the Old (Protease Therapy for Cancer); On with the NEW (Papain in Papaya Leaf as the Protease)

Proponent of Protease Enzyme Therapy for Cancer, Dr. Gonzales, carefully reviewed prior clinical studies performed by Dr. Kelley at Cornell University and the treatments were shown to have effect.
“Historically, large doses of proteolytic enzymes, along with diet, nutritional supplements, and “detoxification” procedures, have been used in alternative therapies to treat all forms of cancer, without formal clinical studies to support their use. A 2-year, unblinded, 1-treatment arm, 10-patient, pilot prospective case study was used to assess survival in patients suffering inoperable stage II-IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with large doses of orally ingested pancreatic enzymes, nutritional supplements, “detoxification” procedures, and an organic diet. From January 1993 to April 1996 in the authors’ private practice, 10 patients with inoperable, biopsy-proven pancreatic adenocarcinoma were entered into the trial. After one patient dropped out, an 11th patient was added to the study (however, all 11 are considered in the data tabulation). Patients followed the treatment at home, under the supervision of the authors. As of 12 January 1999, of 11 patients entered into the study, 9 (81%) survived one year, 5 (45%) survived two years, and at this time, 4 have survived three years. Two patients are alive and doing well: one at three years and the other at four years. These results are far above the 25% survival at one year and 10% survival at two years for all stages of pancreatic adenocarcinoma reported in the National Cancer Data Base from 1995. This pilot study suggests that an aggressive nutritional therapy with large doses of pancreatic enzymes led to significantly increased survival over what would normally be expected for patients with inoperable pancreatic 6|Page adenocarcinoma.”

-“Evaluation of Pancreatic Proteolytic Enzyme Treatment of Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas, With Nutrition and Detoxification Support”
Nicholas Gonzales and Linda Lee Isaacs
Nutrition and Cancer, volume 33 -Issue 2 March 1999 , pages 117 – 124

Protease Enzymes for Cancer Doctor/ Scientists 2005 and prior:

Beard, Dr. John
Howell, Dr. Edward
Wolf, Dr. Max
Benitez, Helen
Ranzberger, Dr. Karl
Kelley, Dr. William Donald
Gonzales, Dr. Nicholas
Isaacs, Dr. Linda
Good, Dr. Robert
Nieper, Dr. Hans
Murray, Dr.
Trnka, Dr. Frantisek
Novak, Dr. Josef F.

Papaya Leaf Tea; Enzyme Therapy for Cancer

Papaya Leaf tea can be taken as a form of enzyme therapy. Proteases (protein dissolving enzymes) continue to show effect against cancers in the lab.

Dr Beard, the Scottish embryologist, showed the effect of trypsin (similar to our body’s natural protease) taken from a young calf on human cancerous tumors. The enzyme “ignites” activity in the human body. In Dr Beard’s studies, trypsin injected directly into cancerous tumors appeared to slow down or stop tumor growth.

Why would we need more proteases in our body if it already produces trypsin? Dr Howell, the famous enzyme scientist, addressed that question by the analogy of our bodies having an enzyme “bank” that becomes depleted as we age and when we consume cooked food. The idea is that cooked food does not contain necessary digestive enzymes, so the body essentially must borrow from the “bank”. When the bank becomes depleted of proteases from digesting cooked food it has less ability to use these enzymes for healing.

Additional factors create an environment for cancerous, non-differentiated cells to grow. A Key to changing toxic, low oxygen cellular environments is to give your body the digestive enzymes necessary to function food digestion and remove toxic waste as it builds up in the blood.

Enzyme therapy contributes to this goal. Papaya leaf tea has a very unique set of proteases in nature called papain and chymopapain. These proteolytic enzymes are more powerful than your body’s trypsin.

Papaya leaf tea can be a form of enzyme therapy if taken on a regular basis and for a minimum of three months.

Papaya Leaf Tea Stimulates Macrophages

20130624-111330.jpg

Scientists have discovered that papaya leaf tea stimulates macrophages, the “big eaters” in your body.

Macrophages clean up waste in your body including poisons, pathogens, and, of course, cancer cells.

In photo above the macrophage is extending its arms to engulf two pathogens.

A very good description of macrophages was published in Science Daily (below):

American Physiological Society (2010, August 27).

Macrophages: The ‘defense’ cells that help throughout the body. –ScienceDaily. Retrieved

Aug. 27, 2010 — The term “macrophage” conjures images of a hungry white blood cell gobbling invading bacteria. However, macrophages do much more than that: Not only do they act as antimicrobial warriors, they also play critical roles in immune regulation and wound-healing. They can respond to a variety of cellular signals and change their physiology in response to local cues.

“There has been a huge outpouring of research about host defense that has overshadowed the many diverse activities that these cells do all the time,” said Dr. Mosser. “We’d like to dispel the narrow notion that most people have that macrophages’ only role is defense, and expand it to include their role in homeostasis.”

Monocyte Differentiation
Macrophages exist in nearly all tissues and are produced when white blood cells called monocytes leave the blood and differentiate in a tissue-specific manner. The type of macrophage that results from monocyte differentiation depends on the type(s) of cytokines that these cells encounter. Cytokines are proteins produced by immune cells that can influence cell behavior and affect interactions between cells. For example, macrophages that battle microbial invaders arise in response to interferon-γ, a cytokine that is produced during a cellular immune response involving helper T-cells and the factors they produce. These macrophages are considered to be “classically activated.”
However, when monocytes differentiate in response to stimuli such as prostaglandins or glucocorticoids, the resulting macrophages will assume a “regulatory” phenotype. Alternately, wound-healing macrophages arise when monocytes differentiate in response to interleukin-4, a cytokine which is released during tissue injury…

Immune Regulation
Immune-regulating macrophages produce high levels of the cytokine interleukin-10, which helps suppress the body’s immune response. Suppressing an immune response may seem counter-intuitive, but in the later stages of immunity it comes in handy because it limits inflammation.

According to Dr. Mosser, immune-regulating macrophages may hold the key to developing treatments for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The focus of new research is on reprogramming the macrophages to assume a regulatory phenotype and prevent autoimmunity, he said.
There is broad potential for exploiting different stages of macrophage activation, Dr. Mosser added. “It might be possible to manipulate macrophages to make better vaccines, prevent immunosuppression, or develop novel therapeutics that promote anti-inflammatory immune responses.”